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Welcome to my Sustainable addiction! I am a DIY addict, Wife, Mother and Grandmother.  I enjoy sharing my all natural recipes, cooking, cleaning, personal hygiene items, gardening and all things sustainable including my farming.  
We are a family owned, woman run small farm located near the Edisto River in Dorchester County SC.
Our farming operation consists of poultry, quail, eggs, dairy and meat goats. You can buy from us with confidence as we hold a permit from SC to sell Poultry and are also licensed as a Wholesale Egg Distributor.
 
Through our farming practices we provide for our community a variety of Poultry breeds, Heavy dual purpose birds, exotic and ornamental chickens as well as Cortunix Quail that are heat tolerant for our hot SC Summers. 

Whether you are looking for Farm Fresh Eggs, Fertile eggs for hatching (Chicken and Quail), hatchlings, grown birds or Dairy and Meat Goats (seasonal births) we have a large selection of beautiful animals.  
 
We also have Dairy Goats and kids. Current 2017 births so far are 5 kids Nubian / Alpine Saneen cross and 2 Nubian / Toggenburg Cross.
  

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Gardening, its not just for "Country Folk"

How is your garden growing? Whether you are a seasoned gardener or new to getting your hands dirty, the most important thing to remember is that you will have good crops and you will have bad crops. You do it to enjoy it! Not everyone is good at growing all things ~ you will quickly find out what fruits and Veggies grow well for you in your area and which ones do not. Over all, with a little care you can become one step closer to sustainability. My rule of thumb is do not be afraid to plant too much, your friends, co-workers & neighbors will love you if you have a bumper crop year! 




Have you been thinking about gardening but just never got started? Here are a few of the reasons I do it and the benefits I have encountered. This list will vary from person to person.

  • Gardening can be SO much more than just a way to save money! It puts Quality food on your table, food that REALLY does taste better than what you buy in the stores. 
  • You do not have to worry about what chemicals were sprayed on them in the fields to fight off insects or to keep them fresh longer once they are harvested. 
  • My bunnies LOVE when they get the tops off my carrots, beets & lettuce and even an occasional cucumber as a treat. Of course they don't mind the grapes or the strawberries either!
  • Gardening is and should be a family affair! Children love to help, they get a deep satisfaction to watch what they have sown with their little hands come to life, they even have more fun when it is time to harvest. This is a life long learning skill for them, one they will share with others. 
  • Do you really want to do something about world hunger problems? What better way than to get a couple of packs of seeds and then show people how to plant and grow their own food. Let's face it, if you are on public assistance you do not get enough money to buy quality food for the month AND the fresh fruits and vegetables that you need are often just to EXPENSIVE.
  • You can grow a LOT of food in a very limited space! I often hear people say, "I live in a neighborhood and do not have much yard, I wished I lived in the country like you" Honestly you can work with what you have! There are so many options, raised beds that are stepped up for a large variety in a small space, 5 gallon buckets for Tomatoes & Potatoes, Hanging planters and sunny window sills. You are only limited by your creativity. Check out some gardening websites, blogs and home improvement stores. See what idea's you can come up with :)
  • I actively try to learn how to start from seeds from my previous crop or propagate my existing plants into my next crop. Every new success I have saves me money on not having to buy plants for my next season of growing. I have copied below (bottom of page) for you a comprehensive list from the Clemson Extension (for all you tiger fans) of the planting guidelines for the SC area. Other zones will have to adjust the starting time.
  • Here is what I currently have growing in my fall to winter and will plant some more soon.

  • Beets
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Carrots
  • Cucumbers (2nd Crop) - I just pulled these up
  • Lettuce
  • Peppers - Green & Red Bell, Hot (cayenne, jalapeno and Tabasco) * These will keep on growing until you pull them up! I have literally taken mine up at Christmas time, still blooming so I could get my bed ready for my early spring planting..... I may just leave them all winter this year and see what they do!
  • Potatoes - Red, White and Sweet (2nd Crop) - If you have never grown sweet potatoes are YOU in for a treat! They grow as a vine, under the plant you will get 5-6 potatoes, and as the vine grows and re-roots in the dirt it forms another complete set. Give these plants LOTS of room in well tilled soil to maximize your harvest! 
  • Squash - Yellow Crook neck - they are thriving in this cooler weather
  • Tomatoes (2nd Crop) * I intend to keep at least a couple of my plants growing inside this winter to use as my starter / propagating mothers for next years plants. Keep an eye out for frost, the plants will keep on producing unless you reach a point where you have several very cold nights in a row. Check out my post about how to start your own plants HERE if you keep only 1 plant going in your house over the winter it could save you from having to buy the plants next spring :) 
As a side note on my fall and winter garden, the maintenance is much lower than my summer garden. With cooler temps the soil is not so quick to loose its moisture so I have to water less. 


Table 1. Planting Chart — Dates to Plant in South Carolina

PiedmontCentralCoastal
VegetableSpringFallSpringFallSpringFall
1Transplant plants.
2For longer harvest season, plant at intervals during suggested dates.
3Seed potatoes for July planting and fall harvest may have to be mailed-ordered (usually unavailable from local garden supply stores).
AsparagusEarly Feb.-
Late Mar. (crowns)
Late Jan.-
Early March. (crowns)
Early Jan.-
Late Feb. (crowns)
Beans, SnapApr. 15-30Aug. 1-15Apr. 1-15Aug. 5-20Mar. 15-30Aug. 15-30
Beans, PoleApr. 15-30July 15-25Apr. 5-20July 20-30Mar. 20-30Aug. 1-10
Beans, Half-runnerApr. 15-30Aug. 1-15Apr. 1-15Aug. 5-20Mar. 15-30Aug. 15-30
Beans, LimaMay 1-15July 1-15Apr. 5-20July 20-30Mar. 20-30Aug. 1-10
Beans, Pole LimaMay 1-15July 1-15Apr. 5-30July 15-20Mar. 20-
Apr. 15
July 20-30
Beans, Edible SoyMay 10-
June 15
May 10-
July 1
May 10-
July 15
BeetsMarch 1-30Aug. 1-15Feb. 1-28Aug. 1-20Dec. 15-
Jan 30
Aug. 1-20
Broccoli1Mar. 1-15July 1-30Feb. 20-
Mar. 10
July 20-
Aug. 15
Feb. 15-
Mar. 1
Aug. 10-
Sept. 15
Brussels SproutsJuly 15-
Aug. 15
Aug. 1-15Aug. 1-15
Cabbage1Feb. 15-
Apr. 1
July 1-30Jan. 15-
Mar. 1
July 25-
Aug. 10
Dec. 1-
Jan 15
Aug. 1-15
Cantaloupe & HoneydewApr. 15-
May 15
June 15-30Apr. 1-15Mar. 10-
Apr. 10
CarrotsMar. 1-15July 1-30Feb. 10-28Aug. 1-15Dec. 15-
Jan 30
Aug. 1-20
Cauliflower1Mar. 1-15July 1-15July 25-
Aug. 10
Aug. 1-20
CollardsJuly 1-
Aug. 30
Feb. 25-
Mar. 20
July 15-
Aug. 15
Feb. 20-
Mar. 15
Aug. 1-25
CucumbersApr. 15-
May 15
July 1-15Apr. 1-15Aug. 1-10Mar. 20-30Aug. 1-20
Eggplant1May 1-15July 1-15Apr. 10-25July 10-20Mar. 25-Apr.10July 20-25
GarlicSept. 1-
Oct. 30
Sept. 15-
Nov. 15
Oct. 1-
Nov. 30
KaleAug. 15-
Sept. 15
Aug. 15-
Sept. 15
Aug. 15-
Sept. 15
LettuceMar. 1-15Aug. 15-25Feb. 1-28Aug. 15-25Dec. 20-
Feb. 5
Aug. 15-25
Mustard2Feb. 1-
Mar. 15
Aug. 15-
Sept. 15
Jan. 15-
Feb. 25
Aug. 15-
Oct. 1
Jan. 1-
Feb. 25
Aug. 15-
Oct. 1
Onion, SetsMar. 1-30Sept. 1-
Oct. 30
Feb. 15-
Mar. 15
Sept. 15-
Nov. 15
Feb. 1-
Mar. 1
Oct. 1-
Nov. 30
Onion, PlantsMar. 1-30Feb. 15-
Mar. 15
Feb. 1-
Mar. 1
Onion, SeedsSept. 15-
Oct. 15
Oct. 1-
Oct. 30
OkraMay 1-15June 15-30Apr. 10-30June 15-30Apr. 1-20June 15-
June 30
PeanutsMay 1-15Apr. 15-
May 15
Apr. 25-
May 15
Peas, GardenFeb. 1-15Jan. 20-30Jan. 10-20
Peas, SouthernMay 1-
June 30
Apr. 10-30June 20-30Mar. 25-
Apr. 15
Aug. 1-10
Pepper1May 1-30July 20-25Apr. 5-25July 15-25Mar. 25-
Apr. 10
July 20-25
Potatoes, IrishMar. 15-30July 1-153Feb. 20-
Mar. 10
July 15-303Feb. 1-15July 15-303
Potatoes, SweetMay 10-
June 10
May 1-
June 15
Apr. 15-
July 1
PumpkinsJune 1-15June 15-30July 1-15
Radish2Feb. 15-
Mar. 15
Sept. 1-30Feb. 1-28Sept. 1-
Oct. 25
Jan. 1-Mar. 1Sept. 1-
Nov. 1
RutabagaAug. 1-20July 25-
Aug. 10
Aug. 1-20
Spinach2Feb. 15-
Mar. 15
Sept. 15-30Feb. 1-28Sept. 15-
Oct. 20
Jan. 1-
Feb. 25
Sept 15-
Nov. 10
Sweet Corn2Apr. 15-30Mar. 20-
Apr. 30
Mar. 10-
Apr. 30
Squash, SummerApr. 15-
May 15
July 1-20Apr. 1-20Aug. 1-15Mar. 20-
Apr. 10
Aug. 10-25
Squash, WinterApr. 20-
May 15
Apr. 15-30Mar. 20-
Apr. 10
Aug. 10-25
Tomato1May 1-
May 30
July 10-20Apr. 5-25July 10-20Mar. 25-
Apr. 10
July 25-30
Turnips2Feb. 20-
Apr. 1
Sept. 1-15Feb. 1-
Mar. 10
Aug. 1-Oct. 1Jan. 1-Mar. 1Aug. 25-
Oct. 15
WatermelonApr. 20-
June 30
Apr. 1-30June 15-30Mar. 25-
Apr. 20